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After Irma, there’s a lot of activity in the tropics

After Irma, there's a lot of activity in the tropics

  • Tropical Storm Jose, with winds around 70 miles an hour, is likely to develop into a hurricane by Saturday.
  • The storm is expected to become Tropical Storm Lee by Saturday morning, if not Friday night, as it slowly works it’s way west.
  • The storm is not expected to strengthen into a hurricane over the next 5 days.
  • The National Hurricane Center could issue Tropical Storm and Hurricane Watches for the Lesser Antilles Islands by Saturday as this energy moves west.
  • First Coast Storm Experts have their eyes on the tropics and are reminding folks of the First Coast to always remain prepared during hurricane season.

In the wake of Harvey and Irma, two devastating storms, there’s still about two and a half months of the hurricane season left. Right now, there’s plenty of activity out in the tropics.

@10NewsWTSP: After Irma, there’s a lot of activity in the tropics

JACKSONVILLE, FL. – In the wake of Harvey and Irma, two devastating storms, there’s still about two and a half months of the hurricane season left. Right now, there’s plenty of activity out in the tropics.

First, we have Jose. Tropical Storm Jose, with winds around 70 miles an hour, is likely to develop into a hurricane by Saturday. The storm is cruising up to the north and expected to come very close to the northeastern U.S.

Jose will not impact the southeastern U.S., other than bringing a long period swell and rip currents this weekend. But, as of now, it’s those from North Carolina, Virginia up to New Jersey and Long Island that should be eyeing up this storm.

Second, we have Tropical Depression 14. The system is nearly 4,000 miles out in the Atlantic, sitting off the coast of Africa. The storm is expected to become Tropical Storm Lee by Saturday morning, if not Friday night, as it slowly works it’s way west. TD14, as of now, poses no threat land and through the next week will remain out over the open Atlantic. The storm is not expected to strengthen into a hurricane over the next 5 days.

Third, we have a tropical wave. A tropical wave (bunch of clouds and thunderstorms) that is bubbling 1,100 miles east of the Windward Islands. This pocket of energy is positioned ahead of TD14 over the open Atlantic. There is a good chance of development here, by the end of the weekend we could be looking at a tropical cyclone.

The National Hurricane Center could issue Tropical Storm and Hurricane Watches for the Lesser Antilles Islands by Saturday as this energy moves west. As of now, there is no immediate threat over the next 5 days here along the First Coast.

First Coast Storm Experts have their eyes on the tropics and are reminding folks of the First Coast to always remain prepared during hurricane season.

After Irma, there’s a lot of activity in the tropics

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